First Baptist Church Cemetery Elliston, Virginia

First Baptist Church Cemetery Elliston, Virginia
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Comment by Alva H. Griffith on April 28, 2012 at 4:28am

Great work, Gayle.  Thanks so much for this.

Comment by Loretta B Smith on April 24, 2012 at 9:09am

Nice pictures Gayle, are you from Virginia or just visiting?  

Comment by Vicky on April 23, 2012 at 10:58pm

Wow! this is great.. thanks for posting this and thank you Gayle Fisher

Comment by Nadia K. Orton on April 23, 2012 at 8:18pm

Great photo album!  Thanks so much for posting, and thanks to Gayle Fisher.

Comment by Forum AfriGeneas on April 23, 2012 at 7:36pm

The First Baptist Church Cemetery of Elliston Virginia was photographed by Gayle Fisher and donated to AfriGeneas.

Elliston, Virginia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"Elliston is a census-designated place (CDP) between the cities of Roanoke and Christiansburg in Montgomery County, southwest Virginia. The population as of the 2010 Census was 902.[1] It is home to a small fire department, an elementary school, two gas stations, a train stop, and several churches. Most of its residents do not work in Elliston, but choose to commute to larger towns. A set of railroad tracks separates the northwestern part of the town from the rest. US highway 11-460 further divides the town into two distinct neighborhoods, "Oldtown," which formed along the Valley Road in the 1850s, and "The Brake," a predominantly African-American area that developed after the Civil War.

Originally known as Big Spring, the town's depot was an important stopping point on the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad and later the Norfolk and Western. In the late 1880s, investors hoped to create a large industrial and railroad center there, to be known as Carnegie City. Instead, the railroad chose the Roanoke County town of Big Lick, later Roanoke, as the location for its main shops."

The plan is to identify each stone by the inscription for ease in searching.

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